Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Craftsmanship And Dexterous Intelligence


Conclusions?


Well, at least we've institutionalized half of the human race. If this were happening based on race, people would be up in arms.

TeacherHann on twitter suggested that traits we've bred into men are redundant now that we don't hunt, gather or manufacture anything. We still hunt, gather and manufacture things, we've just found a way to off-load it to out-of-sight, globalized slaves we don't have to think about.

Then we de-value work that boys enjoy (physicality, single minded intensity), because we've made most of the human race serve our own systemic greed and laziness. We've gotten to the point now where there are psychological factories designed around reshaping boys to sit in cubicles.

If we continue to develop an institutionalized and absolute rule of law that dictates our security, then we will continue to find little value in the physicality boys might offer.

If we continue to develop food production and manufacturing on globalist supply logic, then we will use remote, third world financial slavery to produce and build what we use, further devaluing the physical manufacturing that boys used to gravitate toward. Agribusiness will remove people from the food system in favour of machines and internationalization to cheaper markets, further reducing the need (and value) we have for physical labour.

This isn't just a matter of menial labour either. In the process of giving up our hands in favour of a 'mind economy' we also lose craftsmanship. When an automated plant supported by the working poor thousands of miles away does your manufacturing for you, you're only left with your mind economy, and it's a remarkably un-self-sustaining, self serving place.

Better hope the oil lasts. Once we've medicated all our boys into cubicles, there won't be too many people left willing to get their hands dirty while they relearn how to have intelligent dexterity. Mind economies can't feed themselves, or build for themselves.

Our brains our infinitely plastic (Carr). When we begin using a new tool, our brains actually reorganize in order to recognize the tool as a part of our body. If you know how to use a screw driver, it is because your mind has molded itself in such a way as to be able to understand the screwdriver as a part of itself. Looked at this way, our hands are the greatest gateway to differentiated thinking and an accurate understanding of the world around us. What and how we build actually dictates how we think.

If the only tools left to us are keyboards and mice, what then our minds?